Thursday, January 15, 2009

Laurie Anderson


Finally those pesky holidays are over and life is finally back to normal. After the hustle and bustle that ensues in December, the first couple of weeks in January seem almost strange by comparison. So that leads me to thinking of strange things and melancholia. When I get to feeling that way, that's when I start to pull out some of my weird stuff and chillax, seems like I appreciate it more. January always seems to be the time of the year when I listen to Laurie Anderson a lot. Half of her catalog is a bit wiggy and perplexing, yet strangely alluring.

Laurie Anderson is a poet, writer, visual artist, and social commentator, who is perhaps best known as a recording artist, one whose technical wizardry and live shows have earned her a reputation as one of the most eccentric performers in the business. In general she's known as a "performance artist." A performance artist is an artist who works in the medium of live performance. Laurie's performances use a bewildering variety of media, including film, electronic and acoustic music, slides, costumes, and other weird effects that don't even have names. Some common themes in her works are airplanes, dogs, family, the United States, dreams, and language. She scored her first and only hit back in 1982 with her opus O Superman, which came out in 1981. If you've heard that song you'll agree that it's pretty trippy. She has invented a couple of instruments for use in her live shows, most notably a tape-bow violin that uses recorded magnetic tape on the bow instead of horsehair and a magnetic tape head in the bridge. In the late 1990s, she developed a talking stick, a six-foot-long batonlike MIDI controller that can access and replicate different sounds. While she may have had her most success in the 80's she has continued to busy throughout the years and on April 12, 2008, Laurie Anderson married longtime companion Lou Reed in a private ceremony in Boulder, Colorado.

Born Never Asked
Language is a Virus
Buy It


Funny Toon

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